FIGHTING PROSTATE PROCRASTINATION


My friend Jim has the right idea as far as health care is concerned. He has a full medical check-up every year like clockwork. “I always go on my birthday. That way I always remember to do it, and when to do it.

This would be a great system for almost everyone except him. Jim’s birthday is December 25, so I doubt he’s had a check-up yet.

Men have finally got their healthcare act together. They march into their doctors’ offices to get examined to get digital rectal exams for prostate cancer. They take opportunities to take charge of their own health care. They have hope that if they have prostate cancer, it can be detected early. The earlier it is detected, the greater the chance of survival.

Men rented space on their upper lips to grow moustaches to raise money for prostate cancer awareness: and to improve the quality of life for men and their families living with and surviving the results of treatments. Those moustaches have raised $550 million to fund 800 worthwhile programs during these Movember campaigns[1] Men have been doing good.

Prostate cancer is the most common one among Canadian men. It begins when some of the glandular cells don’t behave normally and may lead to non-cancerous prostatitis, precancerous conditions, or cancerous conditions –  a malignant tumor that starts in the prostate’s cells and moves to the rest of the body. [2]

There are genetic and environmental causes. Some things in life that you cannot control: genetics, age and taxes. You may be able to control some environmental causes.

The Canadian Cancer Society has outlined the symptoms. These include:

  • Frequent urination – especially at night
  • Difficulty in starting or stopping the urine flow
  • Inability to urinate
  • Weak or decreased urine stream
  • Interrupted urine stream
  • A sense of incompletely emptying the bladder
  • Burning or pain during urination

Symptoms at later stages include:

  • Bone pain in the back, hips, thighs and neck
  • Weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Low red blood cell count (anemia)
  • Weakness or numbness in the legs or feet
  • Loss of bladder or bowelcontrol[3]

 

Prostate-Specific Antigen  (PSA) testing has been used to detect prostate cancer, and to monitor the recurrence or progression of the cancer. The problem is that the presence of PSA in the blood does not necessarily mean there is a cancer. And may yield a false positive result.[4] As a result, the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommends forgoing the test for men of all ages..[5] The digital rectal examination, where the health care provider inserts a gloved hand into the rectum and feels the prostate for hard, lumpy or abnormal areas.[6]

Environmental causes, the ones you can do something about, include.

  • Diet: Avoid heavy reliance on fats from animals and less reliance on vegetables and fruits
  • Latitude: Men south of the 40 degrees latitude have lower incidence of prostate cancer indicating a need for vitamin D
  • Smoking:
  • Being sedentary: Get some exercise.[7]
  • Stress: Group mindfulness may have a place managing prostate cancer[8]

Doing something about your condition means taking action. There is no room for putting it off.

Tackling prostrate Procrastination:

If you have some of the symptoms, or have gone to the health care provider and have been advised to make some changes, here are some actions you can take to make those changes

Diet is an environmental factor that can influence prostate cancer. For prevention, and limiting further cancerous growth, avoiding meat has been recommended , particularly grilled, fried and broiled meats, as well as limiting dairy products. Stick with fruits and vegetables.

Foods and Supplements Sidebar[9]

Lycopene, an antioxidant in tomatoes found to have some benefit in prevention of prostate and other cancers, and inhibiting cancer growth. It is also found in found in guava, apricots and watermelon.10

Calcium is required for many body functions, and is found in dairy products as well as (in smaller amounts) kales etc. Tests show that substituting dairy for cashew or soy milk.

Green tea may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease and against various forms of cancer, including prostate cancer.

Citrus pectin in the peel and pulp of citrus fruit and can be and may have effects on cancer growth and metastasis through multiple potential mechanisms.

Pomegranate juice and extract inhibit various prostate cancer cells.

There may be an inverse relationship between selenium supplementation and cancer risk.

Studies have researched the relationship between vitamin D and prostate cancer.

Exercise

Recent studies show that exercise – both pre- and post-diagnosis  is important to a good treatment outcome. Good results could come from brisk walking to more rigorous exercises. These should be planned in consultation with your doctor.10

Are you getting enough sleep?

Men who sleep well at night may be at less risk of developing advanced prostate cancer. They have increased levels of the sleep hormone melatonin in their urine, and less instances of advanced cancer.11 To get better sleep move the television out of the bedroom. That blue light it emits can lead to sleeplessness. Daytime blue light is crucial for getting stuff done, but not at night when our biological clocks say we should sleep. In the dark, our bodies produces melatonin that causes us to sleep. In the presence of blue light blasting out of our television screens, melatonin is supressed, suppressing deep sleep. Supressed sleep has been linked to a variety of health problems including obesity and cancer.12

[1] The Movember Foundation (2014) “The Movember Foundation Puts Its Money Where Its Moustache Is to Launch True NTH.”  http://www.marketwired.com/printer_friendly?id=1951423

2 Canadian Cancer Society (n.d.) “Prostate Cancer: What Causes Prostate Cancer?: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/prostate/prostate-cancer/?region=on

3 Canadian Cancer Society (2015). “Prostate Cancer: Signs and symptoms of prostate cancer.” http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/prostate/signs-and-symptoms/?region=on

4 Canadian Cancer Society (2015) “Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/diagnosis-and-treatment/tests-and-procedures/prostate-specific-antigen-psa/?region=on

6 Canadian Task force on Preventive Health Care (2014) “Screening for Prostate Cancer” (2014). http://canadiantaskforce.ca/ctfphc-guidelines/2014-prostate-cancer/

7 Prostate Cancer Health Centre (n.d). “Digital Rectal Exam for Prostate Problems.”. http://www.webmd.com/prostate-cancer/guide/prostate-cancer-digital-rectal-exam

[1] Healthline, “What are the causes of prostate cancer?http://www.healthline.com/health/prostate-cancer-risk-factors#Overview1

9Chambers SK, Foley E, Galt E, Ferguson M, Clutton S. (2011)” Mindfulness groups for men with advanced prostate cancer: a pilot study to assess feasibility and effectiveness and the role of peer support.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21625914

-10  National Cancer Institute. (2015) Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements–for health professionals (PDQ®)” http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/prostate-supplements-pdq#section/_357

11 Prostate Cancer Foundation, (2014). “Exercise and prostate cancer – The evidence stacks up for benefitshttp://www.pcf.org/site/c.leJRIROrEpH/b.8968717/k.695D/Exercise_and_Prostate_Cancer8212the_evidence_stacks_up_for_benefits.htm

 

12 Markt, Ss. (2015) “Sleep may protect against prostate cancer” Harvard School of Public Health. http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/hsph-in-the-news/sleep-and-prostate-cancer/

12 Gunnars, Chris. (2012). “How Blocking Blue Light at Night Can Transform Your Sleep.” http://authoritynutrition.com/block-blue-light-to-sleep-better/

 

[1] The Movember Foundation (2014) “The Movember Foundation Puts Its Money Where Its Moustache Is to Launch True NTH.”  http://www.marketwired.com/printer_friendly?id=1951423

[2] Canadian Cancer Society (n.d.) “Prostate Cancer: What Causes Prostate Cancer?: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/prostate/prostate-cancer/?region=on

[3] Canadian Cancer Society (2015). “Prostate Cancer: Signs and symptoms of prostate cancer.” http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/prostate/signs-and-symptoms/?region=on

[4] Canadian Cancer Society (2015) “Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/diagnosis-and-treatment/tests-and-procedures/prostate-specific-antigen-psa/?region=on

[5] Canadian Task force on Preventive Health Care (2014) “Screening for Prostate Cancer” (2014). http://canadiantaskforce.ca/ctfphc-guidelines/2014-prostate-cancer/

[6] Prostate Cancer Health Centre (n.d). “Digital Rectal Exam for Prostate Problems.”. http://www.webmd.com/prostate-cancer/guide/prostate-cancer-digital-rectal-exam

[7] Healthline, “What are the causes of prostate cancer?http://www.healthline.com/health/prostate-cancer-risk-factors#Overview1

[8] Chambers SK, Foley E, Galt E, Ferguson M, Clutton S. (2011)” Mindfulness groups for men with advanced prostate cancer: a pilot study to assess feasibility and effectiveness and the role of peer support.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21625914

[9] National Cancer Institute. (2015) Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements–for health professionals (PDQ®)” http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/prostate-supplements-pdq#section/_357

10 Prostate Cancer Foundation, (2014). “Exercise and prostate cancer – The evidence stacks up for benefitshttp://www.pcf.org/site/c.leJRIROrEpH/b.8968717/k.695D/Exercise_and_Prostate_Cancer8212the_evidence_stacks_up_for_benefits.htm

11 Markt, Ss. (2015) “Sleep may protect against prostate cancer” Harvard School of Public Health. http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/hsph-in-the-news/sleep-and-prostate-cancer/

13 Gunnars, Chris. (2012). “How Blocking Blue Light at Night Can Transform Your Sleep.” http://authoritynutrition.com/block-blue-light-to-sleep-better/

 

 

Mike Broderick , a one- time archaeologist, is a Vocational Rehabilitation Counsellor with the Fraser Health Authority in Port Coquitlam where he helps people with mental health disabilities find and keep full or part time employment .

 He WAS the Employment Specialist for the Neil Squire Society in Burnaby where he found employment for people with physical disabilities, A Supported Employment Coordinator at THEO BC (now the Open Door Group), and a case manager at Community Fisheries Development Centre where he helped people move from the fishing industry to something else because there, “Aint no fish.” This means he is VERY familiar with how a modern day resume should look.

 He is a newly retired ambassador with the Vancouver Board of Trade and a former member of the Labour Task Force of the Burnaby Board of Trade He does some work as a field Archaeologist, is a fitness instructor and frequent contributor of fitness humour articles to Alive Magazine. He is always saying, “If you can’t be fit, you can at least be funny.”

 He lives in Port Coquitlam with his spouse Cecelia. You can reach him at home at michael_broderick@telus.net  or at 604-464-4105. If you’re looking for a career change, he is the Spin Doctor and can give you a resume makeover at competitive rates.

 

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One Response to “FIGHTING PROSTATE PROCRASTINATION”

  1. energywriter Says:

    Good information. Question: I have some of those symptoms and no prostate. What?? sd

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